A Cannabis Cure-All for Your Pet? Proceed With Caution

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Watching a loved one suffer is stressful. Medical cannabis users say the drug alleviates levels of pain, but could it also help your sick furry friend?

Although many pet owners are already using the drug as medicine, experts warn it’s wise to take caution.

“The problem today is that there is no scientific data that supports the benefits of using cannabis products on pets and therefore, the medical claims are not evidenced based,” said Annemarie Del Mugnaio, Executive Officer with the Veterinary Medical Board.  “Veterinarians are treating a higher number of toxicity cases where dogs have come into contact with cannabis and ingested enough to cause them to become very ill.  We really have no idea what’s in the hemp/cannabis pet products to be able to confirm their intended use or benefits and these products are not FDA approved or regulated.”

According to the DCA Veterinary Medical Board, veterinarians in California cannot prescribe medical cannabis because it’s deemed a schedule I drug and licensees are prohibited from writing a prescription or recommendation for the drug. A veterinarian may be subject to disciplinary action for violating state or federal prescribing laws.

Meanwhile, a growing number of companies are marketing cannabis products for pets despite questions over legality, and pet owners are giving cannabis edibles and topical ointments to sick pets.

Most of these pet products, which aren’t regulated, contain cannabidiol or CBD, a chemical compound found in cannabis that doesn’t get pets or humans high. They contain little or no tetrahydrocannabinol or THC, the cannabis compound known for its psychoactive effects.

Medicinal cannabis for pets is being sold as pet medicine at many licensed medical marijuana dispensaries.

The DCA is tasked to regulate both medical and recreational cannabis through the Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation (BMCR) and is responsible for issuing distribution, transportation, laboratory testing, and dispensary (sale) licenses beginning in 2018.

Medical cannabis is legal in 28 states, however, it remains illegal under federal law.

For updates on prescription medical cannabis for animals, or to check the license and license status of a Veterinarian, please call the Department of Consumer Affairs’ Veterinary Medical Board at (916) 515-5220, or visit their website at vmb.ca.gov.

For more information about the Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation, visit their website at bmcr.ca.gov.

 

MEN! THE NURSING FIELD WANTS YOU!

NURSING TODAY

Thanks to the aging of our population, demand for healthcare services and the number of nurses preparing to retire from the workforce, the job outlook for careers in the field of nursing is promising.

The potential demand for more healthcare providers has created a need for an increase in recruitment and retention of registered nurses (RNs).  A high priority is focused on greater male-nurse-2recruitment of men, with an emphasis on ethnic and national diversity.

It is a great time for men to consider a career in nursing!

OPPORTUNITIES AND BENEFITS

Male nurses are not a new phenomenon.  Historically, nursing had significant male representation until the 1800s.  During the Civil War, a shift began when men were engaged in other pursuits and women stepped into those positions.  By the 1900s, nursing schools were admitting only women, and the Army and Navy Nurse Corps were limited to women.  Men were not allowed to serve in nursing positions in those organizations until after the Korean War.  Currently, women make up the majority of nurses (2011 American Community Survey).  However, since the 1970s, the number of men in the profession has continuously grown as more men discover the richness of career opportunities available in the nursing profession.

“Show me the money!” – Rod Tidwell, Jerry Maguire (1996)

According to recent surveys, RNs have very low unemployment rates because of high demand for skilled nursing care, and annual salaries range from $60,700 to $162,900.

NURSING OCCUPATIONS AND WHAT THEY DO

  • Registered Nurse – Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, maintain medical records, and administer holistic healthcare.  Average pay is $60,000-plus.
  • Nurse Anesthetists – Administer anesthesia and monitor patients’ recovery from anesthesia.  Specialized graduate education is required.  Average pay is $150,000-plus.
  • Nurse-Midwife – Diagnose and coordinate all aspects of the birthing process and provide gynecological care.  Specialized graduate education is required.  Average pay is $80,000-plus.
  • Nurse Practitioner – Diagnose and treat illnesses and may order, perform, or interpret diagnostic tests.  May prescribe medications and work as a healthcare consultant.  Specialized graduate education is required.  Average pay is $80,000-plus.

LIKE WHAT YOU’VE READ SO FAR?

There are many routes to travel to arrive at a nursing career.  Whether you’re still in high school, a college student, or weighing a career change, consider a career in nursing that will allow you to make a positive difference in the lives of others while also achieving your personal and financial goals.men-in-nursing-pic

The California Board of Registered Nursing has helpful resources available to you to assist in your research of a career in nursing.  The brochure “Consider A Rewarding  Career In Nursing!” is available online at the Board of Registered Nursing’s Web site, www.rn.ca.gov.