Board of Podiatric Medicine Appoints New Executive Officer

podiatric_medicine_logo_finalThe California Board of Podiatric Medicine (BPM) announces the appointment of Brian Naslund as its new Executive Officer, effective October 26, 2016.

Read the news release here.

Don’t Put Your Eyes at Risk With Cosmetic Contacts for Halloween

shutterstock_contactsIf you are going all-out on a Halloween costume, complete with cosmetic contact lenses that make your eyes extra spooky, be aware of potential hazards from cheap, nonprescription contacts.

Wearing cosmetic contacts purchased at gas stations, flea markets, or costume shops—any place that doesn’t require a prescription—can damage your eyes in several ways, including corneal scratches, infections, and allergic reactions that can cause impaired vision or temporary or permanent loss of sight.

Selling cosmetic contacts without a state license is against the law, and businesses doing so are operating illegally. Out-of-state companies selling contacts on the Internet to residents of California must be licensed and are required to verify your prescription with your eye doctor.

Although the contacts are not intended for vision correction, it is still vital they fit your eyes correctly. If you don’t have a current prescription, you will need to have your eyes examined by a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist; if you have a current prescription, your eye care professional can give you a copy.

Ophthalmologists are eye surgeons licensed by DCA’s Medical Board of California. They perform surgeries for problems caused by diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, and macular degeneration, and also treat eye diseases and prescribe corrective lenses. Optometrists are licensed by DCA’s State Board of Optometry. They conduct examinations for overall health of the eyes, screen for diseases, and also prescribe corrective lenses.

You can check Medical Board licensees’ records online at www.mbc.ca.gov, and State Board of Optometry licensees at www.optometry.ca.gov.

If you do get a prescription for cosmetic contacts, buy them from a licensed optometrist, ophthalmologist, or registered dispensing optician, and be sure to follow directions for caring for and wearing them properly.

Drop! Cover! Hold on! During the Great California Shakeout

shakeout_global_joinus_728x90California is known as “earthquake country” and for good reason.

There is an infamous 800 mile long crack otherwise known as the San Andreas Fault that travels along the state from the Salton Sea in the south, to Cape Mendocino in the north.

Although earthquakes occur daily in California, many go unnoticed.  While some areas of California are more likely to have earthquakes than others, all of California is at greater risk compared to the rest of the country.

Shake Out Scenario:  

You could be anywhere when an earthquake strikes: at home, at work, at school, or even on vacation.

It is not a matter of if the “big one” will occur, but when.

The Great California ShakeOut is happening this Thursday, October 20th at 10:20am.

Essentially a statewide earthquake drill, the ShakeOut serves as an annual reminder for all Californians to practice how to prepare and be safe during big earthquakes by remembering to “Drop, Cover and Hold On!

drop_cover_hold_on_eng_blue_orangeThe ShakeOut was organized to encourage you, your community, your school, or your organization to practice, review and update emergency preparedness plans and supplies (see last month’s National Preparedness Month post), and to secure your space in order to reduce damage and injuries during an earthquake.

As residents of California, what we do now will determine our quality of life after our next big earthquake.

Are you prepared to survive and recover quickly?

For more earthquake preparedness information resources, please visit http://www.earthquakecountry.org/.

 

COURT REPORTERS CAN DO MORE THAN TAKE DEPOSITIONS

Did you know that not every graduate of a court reporting school works in a legal setting as a court reporter?

pp-courtreporter-092016

Photo by Pamela Powers

Contrary to its name, a degree in court reporting offers a broad selection of career choices.  Well-trained court reporters can be highly sought after.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for CSRs will grow by 18 percent between 2008 and 2018, reflecting the demand for real-time broadcast captioning and translating. This growth rate is faster than the average for all occupations in that time period.

As technology continues to expand, so will the varied career options, allowing those trained in the discipline of court reporting to take their skills out of the courtroom and in to other industries such as television, web broadcasting and the captioning of live, in-person events and presentations. steno-machine

An individual trained in the discipline of court reporting can expect an annual salary range between $30,000 to $100,000 plus, flexible work schedule, the ability to work remotely and/or become their own boss without a four-year college degree.

PATH TO COURT REPORTING:

You must receive two to four years of technical training and be a graduate of a state-approved court reporting school.  If you plan to work in California, you must have a Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR) license administered through the Court Reporters Board of California.

You must also pass a qualifying examination which is comprised of a two-person live voice dictation for five minutes at 200-words-per-minute with an accuracy rate of 97.5% and a written exam in spelling (English), grammar, punctuation and terminology.

CAREER OPTIONS BEYOND THE COURT ROOM

Some court reporters, also known as certified shorthand reporters (CSRs), do function in the capacity of “official reporter” in a courtroom or during litigation-related sessions such as a deposition.  Every word that is spoken during a judicial proceeding is captured verbatim by the official reporter in the form of a transcript (they turn speech into text), and they serve a very important role as the keeper of the courtroom record.

Photo by Norma Miller

Photo by Norma Miller

But there are many more career opportunities for court reporters. Thanks to technology, millions of people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing are able to effectively communicate by utilizing the aids and services provided by court reporters.  This ever-expanding access to mass media is expected to increase and those with court reporting skills will continue to see career opportunities increase, beyond a legal setting.

Here are two of the most common in-demand services that court reporters can specialize in.

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Photo by Peter Foley

CART – Communication Access Real-time Translation:  By using a computer that translates as it goes in a process called Computer-Aided Transcription (CAT), the CART provider is able to send instantaneous transcripts directly to readers’ computer screens.  CART eliminates the need for the deaf or hard of hearing to solely rely on lip reading or sign language and allows these individuals to participate in classroom lectures, business presentations, conventions, theater performances and concerts.

BROADCAST CAPTIONERS:

Photo by Jennifer M. Bonfilio

Broadcast captioners, also called stenocaptioners, use court reporting skills to caption live televised programs and events, via a process called closed captioning, for deaf and hard-of-hearing audiences.  Software that displays speech to text in real-time on the screen is used.  Some broadcast captioners may translate dialogue in real time during broadcasts of televised news programs and sporting events; others may caption during the post-production of a program.  Many of these broadcast captioners are front and center at sporting and entertainment events such as the U.S. Open, World Series, Super Bowl and Academy Awards!

As you can see, the possibilities are plentiful.

Interested in exploring further?  The Court Reporters Board of California has career information and helpful resources available at www.courtreportersboard.ca.gov.

Man Arrested for Practicing Medicine Without License

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A Bakersfield man was arrested Tuesday for the unlicensed practice of medicine.

The Investigation and Enforcement Unit – Central Valley Field Office of the California Department of Consumer Affairs’ Division of Investigation arrested Alberto Gonzalez on Tuesday, October 11, 2016, following the investigation of a complaint that was made by a local news reporter.

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Acupuncture Board Appoints New Executive Officer

 SACRAMENTO—The California Acupuncture Board has appointed Benjamin Bodea as its new executive officer, effective October 12, 2016.

Mr. Bodea has served as the board’s acting executive officer since March, overseeing the board’s operations and managing a staff of 12. In this role, he initiated the regulatory process for an omnibus package to refine the board’s regulations, among other accomplishments.

He joined the board as an administrative assistant in 2010, working his way through the ranks in roles that allowed him to amass broad experience in stakeholder relations, enforcement, administration and more.Acupuncture

He studied cognitive science at the University of California, Berkeley, and is a certified massage practitioner.

See the full news release here.

The Acupuncture Board—part of the Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA)—licenses and regulates acupuncturists in California. The board administers an examination that tests an applicant’s ability, competency, and knowledge in the practice of an acupuncturist; issues licenses to qualified practitioners; approves and monitors students in tutorial programs; approves acupuncture schools and continuing education providers and courses; and enforces the Acupuncture Licensure Act.

DCA promotes and protects the interests of California consumers. Consumers can file complaints against licensees by contacting DCA at (800) 952-5210. Consumers can also file a complaint online at http://www.dca.ca.gov.

 

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